Events: Working Paper Lunch Series Spring 2019

In spring 2019, CAP is hosting a Lunch Series featuring our CAP Graduate Program Participants: Matthew Kim, affiliate at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science and Tara Casey, Harvard Law School LL.M. Candidate.  During the talks, each participant will present their research findings, and attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and suggestions.

Lunch will be provided. If you would like to attend one or more of the Lunch Series talks, please RSVP here to ensure that we have enough food available.

Upcoming lunches are:

  • Monday, March 11, 2019 
  • Monday, March 25, 2019

Contact CAP Visiting Researchers and Scholars Program Coordinator Mary Welstead, cap@law.harvard.edu, with questions.

 

Public Support for Restorative Justice in the Juvenile and Criminal Justice System

Discussion with Matthew Kim, affiliate at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science

Monday, March 11, 2019
12:00 – 1:00 PM
23 Everett Street
CAP Suite, G-24
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: What determines public support for restorative justice in the juvenile and criminal justice systems? Numerous restorative justice policies encourage offenders to express fault, victims to forgive, and communities to reintegrate offenders. These policies have had varying degrees of success depending on the degree of public support for each policy. In light of the necessity of public support and contrasting public reactions to such policies, this study explores when the public supports certain policies of restorative justice but not others and which segments of the public are more likely to support such policies. Relying on two online survey experiments of U.S. respondents and South Korean respondents, this study finds that the U.S. public and South Korean public are more willing to support restorative justice for (1) juvenile offenders over adult offenders and (2) nonviolent juveniles over violent juveniles. These findings suggest that criminal justice reforms directed at such offenders are more likely to garner public support.

Biography: Matthew Kim is an affiliate at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science. He previously earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University’s Government Department. His research interests are in public opinion, international human rights law, and criminal law.

 

Illegal Adoptions and the Right to Truth – Ireland’s Obligations Under International Human Rights Law and Transitional Justice

Discussion with Tara Casey, Harvard Law School LL.M. Candidate

Monday, March 25, 2019
12:00 – 1:00 PM
23 Everett Street
CAP Suite, G-24
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: In May 2018, Ireland’s Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Katherine Zappone, announced that her Department had recorded 126 cases of illegally registered adoptions between 1946 and 1969 by St. Patrick’s Guild adoption agency, whereby adoptive parents were registered on the children’s birth certificates as birth parents. This discovery is but one aspect of Ireland’s mistreatment of vulnerable women and their children throughout the twentieth century, which includes incarceration of women in industrial laundries, forced adoption of their children with or without the mother’s consent and the mass institutionalization of children to industrial schools. The Irish Government has thus far taken a piece-meal approach to addressing historic institutional abuse, dealing with different types of institutions and abuse separately, often receiving criticism from survivors, advocates and academics for failing to take a comprehensive, human rights respecting approach. Taking inspiration from the field of transitional justice, this paper will look at the forced and illegal adoptions which took place in Ireland, currently under investigation by a Commission of Investigation and an ad hoc internal records analysis, and examine how the developing international human rights law on the right to truth can guide Ireland’s approach to investigation and redress.

Biography: Tara Casey is an LL.M. Student from Ireland at Harvard Law School (LL.M. expected 2019). She completed her undergraduate law studies at University College Dublin, where she studied family and child law, social inclusion and human rights education in the Irish secondary school level curriculum. She has engaged in policy based research advocacy for both US and Irish organizations on issues ranging from exclusionary school discipline to illegal and forced adoptions in 20th century Ireland. While at HLS, she hopes to further explore the protections of women’s and children’s rights in domestic and international legal systems and upon completion of her LL.M. degree hopes to work in an organisation that promotes systemic barrier removal for access to justice for women and children and advancement of their human rights.