Events: CAP Working Paper Lunch Series – Fall 2015

In fall 2015, CAP is hosting a Lunch Series featuring our two affiliated Visiting Researchers: Charlotte Proudman, Ph.D. candidate at Cambridge University; and Lisa Owens, Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University.  During the talks, each Visiting Researcher will present her research findings, and attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and suggestions. Lunch will be provided.

If you would like to attend one or both of the Lunch Series talks, please RSVP here to ensure that we have enough food available.

Upcoming lunches are:

Contact CAP Visiting Researchers and Scholars Program Coordinator Mary Welstead, cap@law.harvard.edu, with questions.

 

A Socio-Legal Perspective of Female Genital Mutilation in England and Wales


Charlotte Proudman - F15_NEWDiscussion with Charlotte Proudman,
Harvard Law School CAP-affiliated Visiting Researcher and Ph.D. candidate at Cambridge University

Wednesday, November 4, 2015
12:00 – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: It is estimated that over 130,000 women and girls living in England and Wales have been cut, and 60,000 girls every year are at risk of female genital mutilation (FGM). Despite Parliament criminalizing FGM in 1985, there has not been one successful prosecution. As a result, significant legal and policy changes were introduced in the UK’s Serious Crime Act 2015. Given the raft of legal and policy initiatives designed to combat FGM, this presentation explores why FGM persists despite criminalizing the practice.

Biography: Charlotte Proudman is a CAP-affiliated Visiting Researcher for Fall 2015. Charlotte is working on a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Cambridge, researching the role of law in changing harmful social and cultural practices, and specifically female genital mutilation (FGM) against women and girls in the UK. The empirical research involves semi-structured interviews with FGM-practicing community members and professionals responsible for designing and enforcing legislation. Charlotte worked closely with the Shadow Minister for Preventing Violence Against Women and Girls in drafting FGM legislation which was introduced in the Serious Crime Act 2015. Charlotte’s interest in FGM stems from practicing as a barrister in family law. She is a barrister at the Chambers of Michael Mansfield QC in London.

 

 

Family Surveillance of Children and Adolescents

 

Lisa Owens - ResizedDiscussion with Lisa Owens, Harvard Law School CAP-affiliated Visiting Researcher and Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University

Wednesday, November 18, 2015
12:00 – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: Surveillance technologies once associated most strongly with military and government use, are increasingly used between those in intimate relationships, including between family members.  While some types of surveillance and intense observation were always found in family life, new technologies enhance significantly such interpersonal surveillance. It is hypothesized that this has implications for interpersonal relationships in general and especially so for the children and adolescents whose selves are formed in a close and intimate surveillance environments.  In the current stage of this study, I focus on the parent-adolescent relationship where the parent engages in digital and communications surveillance of the adolescent.  In conducting this study, I rely on findings and insights from the social sciences, developmental sciences, the sociology of family law, and the rights of children.

Biography: Lisa Lucile Owens is a CAP-affiliated Visiting Researcher for the 2015-16 academic year. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University in the sociology department.  Broadly, Lisa’s work involves the study of agency, identity, and norms in traditional and novel social spaces, including cyberspaces and markets.  Her current project uses as point of departure policy analogies from non-cyberspace contexts to discuss agency and identity formation of children in cyberspace.  In particular, she focuses on children’s privacy rights, analyzing the rights language already used in both protective measures specific to children and in children’s rights to free expression. This project ultimately interrogates the way rights policies construct “the child” as a rights-holder with agency and identity.

Lisa holds J.D. and LL.M. degrees and is a member of the Massachusetts Bar.  Prior to beginning her Ph.D., Lisa worked at the Harvard Management Company and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.  She also served previously as the Director of Public Affairs for the State of Alabama at Planned Parenthood of Alabama.

Events: CAP Working Paper Luncheon Series – Spring 2015

In spring 2015, CAP is hosting a Lunch Series with Harvard Law School and University Graduate Program students.   A different presenter will discuss his/her work-in-progress at each lunch, and attendees will have the opportunity to provide feedback and suggestions.  Lunch will be provided.

If you would like to attend one or more of the Lunch Series talks, please RSVP here to ensure that we have enough food available.

Upcoming lunches are:

  • Tues., Feb. 3, 2015
  • [Tues., Feb. 10, 2015, rescheduled to Tues., March 3, 2015]
  • Tues., Feb. 24, 2015
  • Tues., Mar. 3, 2015

Contact CAP Visiting Researchers and Scholars Program Coordinator Mary Welstead, cap@law.harvard.edu, with questions.

In Need of Protection and Capable of Action: Sexuality, Law and the Construction of Childhood and Adolescence (1950-1980)

sonja-matter-reformattedDiscussion with Harvard University History Department Visiting Researcher Sonja Matter

Tues., Feb. 3, 2015
12:00 – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: Sexuality functions as a marker for distinct life stages—this is most clearly demonstrated in criminal law. The criminal code of various countries not only determines a distinct legal age of consent but also implements gender specific differentiations in determining these boundaries. This presentation focuses on Austria in the post-war time and examines how legislation and jurisdiction defined sexual maturity: How did ideas about childhood and adolescence determine the balance between a right of sexual agency on the one hand and a right of protection from sexual exploitation on the other?

Biography: Sonja Matter is a visiting researcher in the History Department at Harvard University. She received her PhD at the University of Bern. Prior to attending Harvard, she was a lecturer in the History Department of the University of Bern, Basel and Lucerne. Her main research interests are women’s and gender history, legal history, history of interpersonal violence and history of the welfare state.

Bargaining in the Shadow of Children’s Voices in Divorce Custody Disputes

PeopleHiroharuSaito

Discussion with Harvard Law School LLM Candidate Hiroharu Saito

Tues., Feb. 24, 2015
12:00 – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: This presentation considers the impact of hearing children’s choices/views in the judicial proceedings for divorce and child custody. It discusses how the divorcing parents’ negotiations and bargaining outside the court would change if the children’s voices were utilized inside the court.

Biography: Hiroharu Saito is an LLM student at Harvard Law School. Since his bar-qualification in Japan (2009), he has engaged in children’s issues on a pro bono basis while working at a Japanese leading corporate law firm, Anderson Mori & Tomotsune. He resigned from the law firm in 2012 to pursue his academic career in the area of child and education law. He has an LLB (2008) and is receiving an MA in Education this March (2015) from the University of Tokyo.

Right to Be Born Free: Does the Law Support the Birth and Nurture of Children in Prison?

lotanna-nwodo-headshot-reformattedDiscussion with Harvard Law School LLM Candidate Lotanna Nwodo

Tues., Mar. 3, 2015 (Rescheduled from 2/10/15)
12:00 – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic:
This paper analyzes the rights of Nigerian children who are born or who accompany their mothers to prison when their mothers are remanded in or sentenced to prison. It proposes a healthy balance between the rights of the child, the parental rights of the mother of the child and the duties of the State, and how to practically enforce the fundamental rights of a child caught in this web.

Biography: Lotanna Nwodo is an LLM candidate at Harvard Law School. Prior to his program at Harvard, he was an associate in the Corporate and Commercial Department of the law firm of Aluko & Oyebode. He has a law degree from the University of Nigeria and qualified to practice law in Nigeria in 2012. He is currently interested in the rights of children who are vulnerable as a result of decisions and activities of the State and how to enforce those rights.

Events: CAP Working Paper Luncheon Series – Spring 2013

In Spring 2013, CAP is hosting a Luncheon Series with Harvard Law School JD and Graduate Program students.

A different presenter will discuss his/her work-in-progress at each luncheon, and attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm and provide feedback and suggestions on the presenter’s project.  Lunch will be provided.


Conceiving the Child in Domestic Violence

Discussion with Harvard Law School SJD Candidate Claire Houston

Thurs, Jan 31, 2013
Noon – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic:  This presentation considers the construction of the child in domestic violence law. It focuses on how feminist ideas get translated into institutional theory and practice and the potential consequences for real children, women, and men. The presentation covers one part of a larger project aimed at locating the child within sites of gender conflict in American law and politics.

Biography: Claire Houston is a third-year SJD student at Harvard Law School. Her research focuses on feminist legal reform projects in the area of family law. She is especially interested in the impact such projects have on children’s interests.

Claire holds an LL.M. from Harvard, an LL.B. from Queen’ s University (Canada) and a B.A. in Women’s Studies and Sociology from Trent University (Canada). Prior to attending Harvard, she articled at Ontario Office of the Children’s Lawyer and clerked at the Ontario Court of Appeal. Claire is currently a Richmond Fellow at the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.


Mandatory Newborn HIV Testing As A Model For Universal Newborn Drug Screening

Discussion with Harvard Law School JD Candidate Melissa Friedman

Thurs, Feb 7, 2013
Noon – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: Presently, mandatory HIV testing of newborns is legal in several states if a mother’s HIV status is unknown at birth. This presentation will examine why such testing is legal and how this model could be applied to legalize universal drug screening for newborns.

Biography: Melissa graduated summa cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis with majors in Latin American Stuides and Spanish. She spent two years after graduation in New York as a securities litigation paralegal, first with Stone Bonner & Rocco and then with Weil, Gotshal & Manges. During her time in New York, Melissa also became a court-appointed special advocate, working to protect the interests of children in the foster care system. She is currently in her second year at Harvard Law School, where she continues to work on child advocacy issues both inside and outside the classroom. She spent the summer of 2012 working with the Juvenile Rights Practice at Legal Aid in the Bronx, and will be spending this upcoming summer as a litigation summer associate with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in New York.


From Hysteria to Realism: Critiquing the Construction of Child Trafficking for Labor Exploitation in Nigeria

Discussion with Harvard Law School LLM Candidate Sedoo Manu

Thurs, March 7, 2013
Noon – 1:00 PM
CAP Suite (WCC 4133)
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: This is an overview of Manu’s work in progress on the LL.M. long paper. This paper steps back and critically reflects on the construction of child trafficking for labor exploitation by focusing on the Nigerian context. It claims that what is currently understood as child trafficking is in fact the product of hyperbolic exaggerations designed to elicit attention and cooperation by creating outrage. Further, it contends that the policies emanating from such an understanding are skewed and portend negative distributive outcomes for their supposed beneficiaries.

Biography:  Sedoo Manu is an LL.M. student at Harvard Law School. Before coming to Harvard, he was an Associate with Nigeria’s leading corporate/commercial law firm. He has an LL.B. (Honors) from Benue State University and a professional qualification from the Nigerian Law School. His current research interests include Critical Perspectives on International Human Rights Law; Legal Theory; and Child Labor Regulations.

Events: CAP Working Paper Luncheon Series – Spring 2012

In Spring 2012, CAP is hosting a Luncheon Series with HLS Graduate Program students and visitors.

More about the series: Each session a different presenter will discuss his/her work-in-progress, and luncheon attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm and provide feedback and suggestions on the presenter’s project.  Lunch will be provided.


Prosecuting the Recruitment of Child Soldiers as a War Crime before the International Criminal Court. A Critical Reading of the Lubanga Case

Discussion with Harvard Law School Visiting Researcher Mahyad Hassanzadeh-Tavakoli

Thurs, February 23, 2012
Noon – 1:00 PM
WCC 4133
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic:  Article 8(2)(b)(xxvi) of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court stipulates that the recruitment and enlisting of children under the age of fifteen years into the national armed forces, or using them to participate actively in hostilities, is to be regarded as a war crime. The issue has most notably been dealt with by the Court in the Lubanga Case. The handling of the case by the ICC Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) has been criticized by different human rights organizations on several grounds. These grounds will be enquired into and discussed in the paper.

Biography: Mahyad Hassanzadeh-Tavakoli is a Ph.D candidate in public international law at Umeå University, Sweden. Her research deals with the tension between the universal view on human rights and the doctrine of cultural relativism. The main purpose of her doctoral thesis is to examine the meaning and practical application of the state’s responsibility to enforce core human rights in the context of plural legal orders.

Mahyad has previously, among other things, worked as a protection lawyer at the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and carried out field research in India and Pakistan regarding human rights implementation. On a voluntary basis, she has worked as a human rights activist for Amnesty International for nearly a decade and held an elective office as a member of the national board of directors for the organization.  Mahyad will spend the academic year of 2011/2012 as a visiting researcher and Fulbright grantee at Harvard Law School.


Contesting Childhood: When Law and Politics go to School

Discussion with Harvard Law School SJD Candidate Lisa Kelly

Thurs, March 8, 2012
Noon – 1:00 PM
WCC 4133
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: There are few experiences more formative for North American children today than “going to school.”  This was not the case just a century and a half ago. In Canada and the United States, universal public schooling was only established in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and even then applied unevenly according to race and aboriginality. Compulsory schooling emerged as part of a larger social, economic, and cultural transformation of childhood.  Progressive-era reformers advocated for a trifecta of laws that would shield the newly innocent (white) child from the moral and material dangers of the adult spheres of work and prison. Child labor prohibitions, mandatory schooling laws, and the creation of a separate juvenile justice system worked in tandem to demarcate childhood from adulthood.

These legal reforms also redistributed authority over the child from the near-exclusive domain of the parental household to the shared authority of the state.  In this presentation, I will discuss how the seeds of “family privacy” were sewn – and also retroactively invented – in response to these redistributions between family and state in the context of mandatory schooling.  I will consider how the question of who shall govern the child – the family or the state – has been central to twentieth-century and contemporary struggles over race, sexuality, and student conduct at school.  I conclude by asking where “the child” herself is left throughout such struggles.

Biography: Lisa Kelly is a doctoral (S.J.D.) candidate at Harvard Law School where her research focuses on family law, criminal law, education law, and sexual and reproductive health law.  Her doctoral dissertation analyzes the legal regulation of the child at school and the law and politics of universal schooling.  Lisa Kelly is a Frank Knox Memorial Fellow, a Trudeau Scholar, and a Doctoral Fellow of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.  After graduating from the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, she articled with the Department of Justice in Ottawa and also clerked for Justice Marshall Rothstein of the Supreme Court of Canada.   Lisa recently served as a legal intern with the Sex Work project at Pivot Legal Society in Vancouver, Canada.


The Street Children of Rio de Janeiro

Discussion with Harvard Law School Visiting Researcher Celina Beatriz Mendes de Almeida

Thurs, March 22, 2012
Noon – 1:00 PM
WCC 4133
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: The paper will discuss the public policy that is being implemented by Rio de Janeiro’s municipal government regarding street children. Since May 2011, street children, including those with drug abuse, are being taken by force out of the streets and being kept in foster houses. This policy has been highly criticized by human rights groups and NGO’s working with children’s right who claim this policy is illegal, against national and international norms for the protection of the child.

Biography:  Celina Beatriz Mendes de Almeida is a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School and a consultant for the International Human Rights Clinic at HLS. She graduated from the LLM program in 2010 and last year worked as a Kaufman Fellow at Human Rights Watch serving the America’s Division. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (2008) where she also worked as a researcher at the Human Rights Center focusing on the Inter-American System of Human Rights. Celina is also part of a NGO that provides legal aid for street children in Rio (Centro de Defesa dos Direitos da Criança e Adolescentes CEDECA – Rio de Janeiro). Besides her interest in street children she is researching on police violence issues and on the prison system in Brazil.

Events: CAP Working Paper Luncheon Series – Spring 2011

In Spring 2011, CAP is hosting a Luncheon Series with HLS Graduate Program students and visitors.

More about the series: Each month a different presenter will discuss his/her work-in-progress, and luncheon attendees will have the opportunity to brainstorm and provide feedback and suggestions on the presenter’s project.  Lunch will be provided.  You should RSVP below to ensure we have enough food available for each session.  Contact CAP’s Visiting Program Coordinator Mary Welstead with questions.  Upcoming luncheons are:


Solutions in Human Rights and the Library Tree Project: creating educational opportunities for children in development and underdeveloped countries

Discussion with LL.M. candidate Caetano Penna Franco Altafin Rodrigues da Cunha

 

Thurs, Feb 17, 2011
Noon – 1:00 PM
Pound 407
Harvard Law School

Lunch will be provided.

Paper Topic: Based on the presenter’s experience creating community libraries in underprivileged regions in Brazil and elsewhere, the workshop will discuss the importance of voluntary-sponsored activities as an alternative means for advancing children’s right to education in development and underdevelopment countries.

Biography: Caetano Penna Franco Altafin Rodrigues da Cunha is an LL.M. candidate at Harvard Law School, and participating in the Child Advocacy Program’s Graduate Students Program (2010-2011).  He is a Fundação Estudar and Instituto Ling Scholar. He graduated in Law by the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (2008), and in International Relations and International Trade by the University Estácio de Sá (2009). He worked as an associate attorney in the corporate and securities department of a leading law firm in Brazil, and as an intern at the Board of the Brazilian Securities and Exchange Commission (CVM). Besides his academic and professional activities, Caetano has 8 years of accumulated experience doing voluntary social work. He created social-educative opportunities by developing sport programs for disabled and underprivileged children in Ireland, Northern Ireland, Brazil and South Africa. He is the chairperson, founder and volunteer of the Social Support Inclusion Society Growing Happy, the Library Tree Project and various student organizations. He has led various voluntary initiatives, including the implementation of 3 community libraries in Brazil. Presently, Caetano is involved in two voluntary social projects directed at the Boston community, and the creation of libraries in Brazil and India, both supported by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.

For more on the Library Tree Project: Click here.


A Second Look at Schools for Indigenous Children

Discussion with Benjamin S. Luis, LL.M. Candidate 2011

Thurs, March 3, 2011
noon – 1:00 PM
Pound 407
Harvard Law School

Paper Topic: This is a preliminary study on the impact of indigenous school programs on the educational achievement of indigenous children in the Philippines. The study will examine indigenous schools in the Philippines, and similar programs for Native American children in the United States and Canada. The value judgments which underpin these programs will be evaluated from the standpoint of the best interests of indigenous children.

Biography: Benjamin S. Luis is now a LL.M. candidate of the Harvard Law School with a Concentration in International Human Rights. He holds a B.A. in Social Sciences (magna cum laude), and J.D. from the University of the Philippines. Prior to attending Harvard, he had worked with Indigenous Peoples in the Philippines on self-determination issues.